Ace of Swords

Written by  on February 22, 2016 

UETD-29

The Ace of Swords have two meanings – sides – just like the sword have two blades. One is the fresh start, the beginning of a New Year. Jewish tradition Rosh Hashanah (“head of the year”) is the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashanah is a two-day celebration, which begins on the first day of Tishrei. Tishrei is the first month of the Jewish civil year, but the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year. The earliest origins of the Hebrew New Year are connected to the beginning of the ecoar in the agricultural societies of the ancient Near East. The New Year was the beginning of the cycle of sowing, growth, and harvest, the latter marked by its own set of major agricultural festivals. The Semites in general set the beginning of the new year in autumn, while other ancient civilizations such as the Persians or Greeks chose spring for that purpose, in both cases the primary reason being agricultural – the time of sowing the seed and of bringing in the harvest.
In its theological interpretation, the day is said to be the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve, the first man and woman, and their first actions toward the believed realization of humanity’s role in God’s world.
This fresh start is symbolized by the Lungs and Air – a fresh breath of air, a new beginning. It’s time for analyze the results and make future planning. It’s time for important decisions. If the Ace of Cups represents the choices of the heart, the Ace of Swords represents the decisions of the mind. It’s time of thoughts and conception. The Ace of Swords symbolize the victory of the ratio, of the mind over body and the man over the nature. The Ace of Swords is the invert image of the Ace of Wands. The Ace of Wands represents sexual attraction, animal magnetism and instincts while the Ace of Swords represents the mental approach, analyze and detailed planning of actions, even the emotional ones.
On the other hand, harvest represents the time of accumulation, the moment of truth when you draw the line and count the result of your previous efforts and it’s time for planning the further steps. The things we’ve started with the Ace of Wands are accomplished now with the Ace of Swords.
In straight position signifies good decisions, opportunities, lucidity, smart investments and gain; reversed signifies bad decisions, hesitations, risky investments, loses.

The element of Air is attached to the signs Gemini, Libra and Aquarius. It also rules the Third, Seventh and Eleventh Houses. It is rarefied air which usually surrounds those graced by this Element, as this is the marker of the intellectual. Airy people are smart thinkers and handle abstract reasoning well. They love to analyze, synthesize and probe. Do you have a dilemma? Hand it over to an Air sign and watch them go to work.
Air Signs are also about communication. These individuals want to get the word out, and it’s not likely to be fluff. They are alert, curious and perceptive. The world as seen by an Air sign will be an interesting one, as their analysis and subsequent explanation (hopefully in terms we can understand) will indicate. Those influenced by Air are inventive and clever. They see all sides of the equation and are able to glean the best approach. Balance is important to these airy folk.
So, are Air signers fresh as a summer breeze, or are they howling like the wind? Probably both, depending on when you catch them. While these folks are often calm and collected, they can turn cold if their equilibrium is upset. A word to the wise: There’s little upside in baiting an Air sign.
Another plus with Air is that it manifests itself in a most humane way. Those influenced by Air can truly wear another’s shoes, as it were. They are objective, cooperative and really want to help make a better world. There’s no prejudice with these folks — just a bright and shiny idealism that can accomplish much.
Air Signs are communicative, intellectual, clever and fair. They can blow hot and cold, though, so beware of a chilly draft! (Source: astrology.com)

Humorism was a system of medicine detailing the makeup and workings of the human body, adopted by the Indian Ayurveda system of medicine, and Ancient Greek and Roman physicians and philosophers, positing that an excess or deficiency of any of four distinct bodily fluids in a person—known as humors or humours—directly influences their temperament and health. The four humors of Hippocratic medicine are black bile (melaina chole), yellow bile (chole), phlegm (phlegma), and blood (haima), and each corresponds to one of the traditional four temperaments.
Essentially, this theory holds that the human body is filled with four basic substances, called humors, which are in balance when a person is healthy. All diseases and disabilities supposedly resulted from an excess or deficit of one of these four humors.
Traditionally, Phlegm was associated with Water, Winter, and Brain while Blood was associated with Air, Spring and Heart. These were incorrect associations based on the philosophical concept of Square of opposition of Aristotle. According to this system, incorrectly, Water was considered wet and cold (cold and moist) and Air was considered wet and hot (warm and moist) while actually Water is wet and hot and Air is wet and dry.

There are two equinoxes every year – in September and March – when the sun shines directly on the equator and the length of day and night is nearly equal.
Seasons are opposite on either side of the Equator, so the equinox in September is also known as the Autumnal (fall) equinox in the northern hemisphere. In the Southern Hemisphere, it’s known as the Spring (vernal) equinox.
The September equinox occurs the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator – the imaginary line in the sky above the Earth’s Equator – from north to south. This happens either on September 22, 23, or 24 every year.
The Earth’s axis is always tilted at an angle of about 23.5° in relation to the ecliptic, the imaginary plane created by the Earth’s path around the Sun. On any other day of the year, either the southern hemisphere or the Northern Hemisphere tilts a little towards the Sun. But on the two equinoxes, the tilt of the Earth’s axis is perpendicular to the Sun’s rays, like the illustration shows.
On the equinox, night and day are nearly exactly the same length – 12 hours – all over the world. This is the reason it’s called an “equinox”, derived from Latin, meaning “equal night”. However, even if this is widely accepted, it isn’t entirely true. In reality equinoxes don’t have exactly 12 hours of daylight.
In the Northern Hemisphere, the September equinox marks the start of fall (autumn). Many cultures and religions celebrate or observe holidays and festivals around the September equinox.
In Greek mythology fall is associated with when the goddess Persephone returns to the underworld to be with her husband Hades. It was supposedly a good time to enact rituals for protection and security as well as reflect on successes or failures from the previous months.
On the autumnal equinox, many pagans celebrate Mabon as one of the eight Sabbats (a celebration based on the cycles of the Sun). Mabon celebrates the second harvest and the start of winter preparations. It is the time to respect the impending dark while giving thanks to the sunlight.
The Christian church replaced many early Pagan equinox celebrations with Christianized observances. For example, Michaelmas (also known as the Feast of Michael and All Angels), on September 29, fell near the September equinox. (Source: timeanddate.com)

Crowley: The Root of the Power of Air. The Ace of Swords is the primordial Energy of Air, the Essence of the Vau of Tetragrammaton, the integration of the Ruach. Air is the result of the conjunction of Fire and Water; thus it lacks the purity of its superiors in the male hierarchy, Fire, Sol and the Phallus. But for this same reason it is the first card directly to be apprehended by the normal consciousness of Mankind. The errors of such cards as the 7 and 10 of Cups are yet of an Order altogether higher than the apparently much milder 4 of Swords. The study of the subtle and gradual degradation of the planes is excessively difficult.
In nature, the obvious symbol of Air is the Wind “which bloweth whithersoever it listeth”. It lacks the concentrated Will of Fire to unite with Water: it has no corresponding passion for its Twin Element, Earth. There is indeed, a notable passivity in its nature; evidently, it has no self-generated impulse. But, set in motion by its Father and Mother, its power is manifestly terrific. It visibly attacks its objective, as they, being of subtler and more tenuous character, can never do. Its “all-embracing, all-wandering, all~penetrating, all-consuming” qualities have been described by many admirable writers, and its analogies are for the most part patent to quite ordinary observers.
But, it will instantly be asked, what of the status of this Element in the light of other attributions? In the Yetziratic World, is not Air the first element to follow Spirit? Is not Vayu the first emer gence of the phenomenal from the arcane obscurity of Akasha? How may one reconcile the doctrine of Mind with the fact that Ruh, or Ruach, actually means Spirit itself? “Achath Ruach Elohirn Chum” (777) means “One is the Spirit (not Air) of the Gods of the Living”? And is not Air, the element attributed to Mercury, al~o most properly the Breath of Life, the Word, the LOL’os itself?
The student must be referred to some less raw, cursory, elemen tary and superficial Treatise than this present bat-eyed, penguin- winged, bluebottlebrained buzzing. Nevertheless, although Air is in no system the lowest, and so cannot claim benefit of clergy from the doctrine that Malkuth automatically resolves into Kether, the following reference seems not wholly to lack either cogency or pertinence.
The Ruach is centred in the airy Sephira, Tiphareth, who is the Son, the firstborn of the Father, and the Sun, the first emanation of the creative Phallus. He derives directly from his mother Binah through the Path of Zain, the sublime intuitive sense, so that he partakes absolutely of the nature of Neschamah. From his father, Chokmah, he is informed though the Path of He’, the Great Mother, the Star, our Lady Nuit, so that the creative impulse is com ~unicated to him by all possibilities soever. Finally, from Kether, the supreme, descends directly upon him, though the Path of Gimel, the High Priestess, the triune light of Initiation. The Three- in-One, the Secret Mother in her polymorphous plenitude; these, these alone, hail him thrice blessed of the Supernals!
The card represents the Sword of the Magus (see Book 4, Part II) crowned with the twenty-two rayed diadem of pure Light. The number refers to the Atu; also 22=2 X II, the Magical manifestation of Chokmah, Wisdom, the Logos. Upon the blade, accordingly, is inscribed the Word of the Law, This Word sends forth a blaze of Light, dispersing the dark clouds of the Mind.

Waite: A hand issues from a cloud, grasping as word, the point of which is encircled by a crown.
Triumph, the excessive degree in everything, conquest, triumph of force. It is a card of great force, in love as well as in hatred. The crown may carry a much higher significance than comes usually within the sphere of fortune-telling.
Reversed: The same, but the results are disastrous; another account says–conception, childbirth, augmentation, multiplicity.

UETD-29

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