The Devil

Written by  on February 23, 2016 

UETD-22

Saturn, is the ruler of Capricorn. In Greek Mythology, Cronus was one of the Titans, and the father of Zeus. Cronus ate his children to prevent himself from being dethroned as the King of the Gods. That is, until his wife, Rhea, tricked him into swallowing a stone when Zeus was born.
In astrology, Saturn is associated with restriction and limitation. Where Jupiter expands, Saturn constricts. Although the themes of Saturn seem depressing, Saturn brings structure and meaning to our world. Saturn knows the limits of time and matter. Saturn reminds us of our boundaries, our responsibilities, and our commitments. It brings definition to our lives. Saturn makes us aware of the need for self-control and of boundaries and our limits.
Saturn is often associated with our fathers or father/authority figures. In childhood, the discipline, rules, and regulations imposed on us by our authority figures–from parents, teachers, and the like–were not always pleasant, but they actually helped us to understand the world around us. Similarly, Saturn’s lessons actually help us to grow. (Source: cafeastrology.com)

Saturn in Aries (Fall).
The best quality of Saturn is system and the best quality of Aries is leadership. Therefore, if you have Saturn in Aries, you can be a very capable leader, one who knows what to do and is not afraid of going out and doing it no matter what it takes or how long it takes. Combat and competitiveness spur you on to greater achievements. Self-reliance is high within you and you probably feel that you are more capable than those around you, hence you may end up doing all the work, which may antagonize you if you feel that others are not holding up their end of things.
Saturn’s worst quality is selfishness and Aries worst quality is interference with the plans of others. Therefore, you are also capable of meddling and trying to run the affairs of others. You may run roughshod over them in trying to get them to do your will rather than their own. You can be a real slave-driver. You dislike restraint of any kind and do not take kindly to others telling you what to do. Remember this as you give the orders. Obstructions, frustrations, and limitations come into play in your pioneering, self-starting efforts. Freedom comes only through responsibility and discipline. Impatience can ruin all the good work you try to do. Caution may need to be developed in the carrying out of your plans. Stability and security are important to you and you work with those thoughts in mind. Feelings of being inadequate may spur you on to tackle immense undertakings in order to feel more valued or worthy. Stress from trying to accomplish too much may make you prone to headaches. Saturn in Aries calls for you to be self-sacrificing. (Source: astrolibrary.org)

In Ancient Rome the Winter Solstice festival Saturnalia began on December 17 and lasted for seven days.
Saturnalian banquets were held from as far back as around 217 BCE. The festival was held to honor Saturn, the father of the gods and was characterized by the suspension of discipline and reversal of the usual order. Grudges and quarrels were forgotten while businesses, courts and schools were closed. Wars were interrupted or postponed and slaves were served by their masters. Masquerades often occurred during this time.
It was traditional to offer gifts of imitation fruit (a symbol of fertility), dolls (symbolic of the custom of human sacrifice), and candles (reminiscent of the bonfires traditionally associated with pagan solstice celebrations). A mock king was chosen, usually from a group of slaves or criminals, and although he was permitted to behave in an unrestrained manner for seven days of the festival, he was usually killed at the end. The Saturnalia eventually degenerated into a week-long spree of debauchery and crime – giving rise to the modern use of the tern saturnalia, meaning a period of unrestrained license and revelry. (Source: timeanddate.com)

The Number 11 – Saturn, Reactive/Practical (Earth)
Positive traits:
– Responsible, patient, resourceful, loyal, executive character and abilities, political skills, expert handling of power and authority, working for a cause, achieving recognition, exercising sound judgment, decisive and commanding.
Negative traits:
– Distrusting, dictatorial, inhibited, materialistic, overly ambitious, conceited, repressing subordinates, impatient with people.

Crowley: The Devil XV (Ayin – 15, Capricorn). This card is attributed to the letter ‘Ayin, which means an Eye, and it refers to Capricornus in the Zodiac. In the Dark Ages of Christianity, it was completely misunderstood. Eliphaz Levi studied it very deeply because of its connection with ceremonial magic, his 4 favourite subject; and he re-drew it, identifying it with Baphomet, the ass-headed idol of the Knights of the Temple. But at this time archaeological research had not gone very far; the nature of Baphomet was not fully understood. At least he succeeded in identifying the goat portrayed upon the card with Pan.
On the Tree of Life, Atu XIII and XV are symmetrically placed; they lead from Tiphareth, the human consciousness, to the spheres in which Thought (on the one hand) and Bliss (on the other) are developed. Between them, Atu XIV leads similarly to the sphere which formulates Existence. (See note on Atu X and arrangement.) These three cards may therefore be summed up as a hieroglyph of the processes by which idea manifests as form.
This card represents creative energy in its most material form; in the Zodiac, Capricornus occupies the Zenith. It is the most exalted of the signs; it is the goat leaping with lust upon the summits of earth. The sigu is ruled by Saturn, who makes for selfhood and perpetuity. In this sign, Mars is exalted, showing in its best form the fiery, inaterial energy of creation. The card represents Pan Pangenetor, the Ml-Begetter. It is the Tree of Life as seen against a background of the exquisitely tenuous, complex, and fantastic forms of madness, the divine madness of spring, already foreseen in the meditative madness of winter; for the Sun turns northwards on entering this sign. The roots of the Tree are made transparent, in order to show the innumerable leapings of the sap; before it stands the Himalayan goat, with an eye in the centre of his forehead, representing the god Pan upon the highest and most secret mountains of the earth. His creative energy is veiled in the symbol of the Wand of the Chief Adept, crowned with the winged globe and the twin serpents of Horus and Osiris.
The Early Christians also were accused of worshipping an Ass, or ass.headed god. See Browning, The Ring and the Book (The Pope).

“Hear me, Lord of the Stars,
For thee have I worshipped ever
With stains and sorrows and scars,
With joyful, joyful Endeavour.
Hear me, 0 lilywhite goat
Crisp as a thicket of thorns,
With a collar of gold for thy throat,
A scarlet bow for thy horns.”

The sign of Capricornus is rough, harsh, dark, even blind; the impulse to create takes no account of reason, custom, or foresight. It is divinely unscrupulous, sublimely careless of result. “thou hast no right but to do thy will. Do that, and no other shall say nay. For pure will, unassuaged of purpose, delivered from the lust of result, is every way perfect.” AL. I, 42-4.
It is further to be remarked that the trunk of the Tree pierces the heavens; about it is indicated the ring of the body of Nuith. Similarly, the shaft of the Wand goes down indefinitely to the centre of earth. “If I lift up my head, I and my Nuit are one. If 1 droop down mine head, and shoot forth venom, then is rapture of the earth, and I and the earth are one.” (AL. II, 26).
The formula of this card is then the complete appreciation of all existing things. He rejoices in the rugged and the barren no less than in the smooth and the fertile. All things equally exalt him. He represents the finding of ecstasy in every phenomenon, however naturally repugnant; he transcends all limitations; he is Pan; he is All.
It is important to notice some other correspondences. The three vowel-consonants of the Hebrew alphabet, Aleph, Yod, ‘Ayin, these three letters form the sacred name of God, I A 0. These three Atu, IX, 0, and XV, thus offer a threefold explanation of the male creative energy; but this card especially represents the masculine energy at its most masculine. Saturn, the ruler, is Set, the ass-headed god of the Egyptian deserts; he is the god of the south. The name refers to all gods containing these consonants, such as Shaitan, or Satan. (See Magick pp.336-7). Essential to the symbolism are the surroundings – barren places, especially high places. The cult of the mountain is an exact parallel. The Old Testament is full of attacks upon kings who celebrated worship in “high places”; this, although Zion itself was a mountain! This feeling persisted, even to the days of the Witches’ Sabbath, held, if possible, on a desolate summit, but (if none were available) at least in a wild spot, uncontaminated by the artfulness of men.
Note that Shabbathai, the “sphere of Saturn”, is the Sabbath. Historically, the animus against witches pertains to the fear of the Jews; whose rites, supplanted by the Christian forms of Magic, had become mysterious and terrible. Panic suggested that Christian child ren were stolen, sacrificed, and eaten. The belief persists to this day.
In every symbol of this card there is the allusion to the highest things and most remote. Even the horns of the goat are spiral, to represent the movement of the all-pervading energy. Zoroaster defines God as “having a spiral force”. Compare the more recent, if less profound, writings of Einstein.

Waite: The Devil XV (15). The design is an accommodation, mean or harmony, between several motives mentioned in the first part. The Horned Goat of Mendes, with wings like those of a bat, is standing on an altar. At the pit of the stomach there is the sign of Mercury. The right hand is upraised and extended, being the reverse of that benediction which is given by the Hierophant in the fifth card. In the left hand there is a great flaming torch, inverted towards the earth. A reversed pentagram is on the forehead. There is a ring in front of the altar, from which two chains are carried to the necks of two figures, male and female. These are analogous with those of the fifth card, as if Adam and Eve after the Fall. Hereof is the chain and fatality of the material life.
The figures are tailed, to signify the animal nature, but there is human intelligence in the faces, and he who is exalted above them is not to be their master for ever. Even now, he is also a bondsman, sustained by the evil that is in him and blind to the liberty of service. With more than his usual derision for the arts which he pretended to respect and interpret as a master therein, Éliphas Lévi affirms that the Baphometic figure is occult science and magic. Another commentator says that in the Divine world it signifies predestination, but there is no correspondence in that world with the things which below are of the brute. What it does signify is the Dweller on the Threshold without the Mystical Garden when those are driven forth therefrom who have eaten the forbidden fruit.

Eliphas Lévi: XV (15) Satan – The Devil – Le Diable.
Come hither now and let us consider without fear this great one, the bugbear of the Christian creed, this ghost of Ahriman, the monstrous androgynous sphynx of Mendes; it is the synthesis of unbalanced forces: a Demon.
The Devil is truly Blind Force. If you help the blind, you may be served by him; if you let the blind lead, you are lost.
Each element and every number has its demon, because each element and every number enshrines a force which ignorance may put to evil purposes. The same sword by which you defend your father, may also slay him.
Know then that the demonic force of each entity must be conquered by knowledge and good purpose. Avoid darkness where demonic power prefers to manifest; fight it in broad daylight, and fearlessly. The Devil, one day, desiring to stop the progress of an adept, broke one wheel of his chariot; but this true adept compelled the Devil to curl himself up on the wheel and act for the time as its tire, and so drove on, reaching his destination even sooner than he would have done if the Devil had let him alone.
Meditate deeply on this old allegorical epigram, Aude et Tace, and when you have seized its occult sense, tell no other of your success.
The symbolic representation of the Devil shows a multiple, disharmonious and anarchic sort of sphynx, typical of confusion and disorder. Note this maxim: A devil is a magnetic current consisting of a concourse of blind and perverse wills.
When certain superstitious mystics relegated intelligence and reason to the Devil, they reversed the Absolute.
That is to say, they chose as their God him who was truly the Devil, and they attributed the malice of Satan to the True God.
There is no child with even ordinary sense who is not more learned than the Devil.
The Devil is even of lower grade than the beings of the Elements. He is doubtless more powerful, but he is as blind as poor Samson became. But to enable the Devil to pull down the pillars of a temple, you would have to lead him to the pillars and say to him, There they are.
No true Magician ever made any attempt to evoke the Devil, for he knows where the Devil is always to be found; but he may order the Devil to work − and the Devil obeys.
In Black Magic, the Devil means the employment of the Grand Magical Agent for a wicked purpose by a perverted Will.

UETD-22

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